Keynote Speaker 
 
Dr Patrick BOURDOT
CNRS Research Director
Head of the "VENISE" V&AR team
University of Paris Sud

Multimodal and Multi-user interactions in CAVEs: ongoing research on the EVE system

Abstract

In this talk we present the body of work whose outcomes have motivated the specification and the construction of the EVE system by the VENISE team at CNRS/LIMSI Lab. These studies focus, for the most part, either on the combination of spatial sensori-motor renderings (visual, haptic or audio), or on the fusion of semantic events delivered by recognition systems (e.g. speech and gesture). In the first case, we addressed several issues, such as virtual navigation control allowing physical involvement of the users, or the specialization of certain sensorimotor channels towards the guidance of users in performing their task rather than providing realistic renderings. In the second case, we underline the added value but also the limits of the multimodal fusion of events in immersive interaction. We also demonstrate that such a supervision process is able to manage collaborative immersive tasks. Last but not the least, we present ongoing research on co-localised or remote collaborative immersion. We describe some perceptive drawbacks of multiuser co-localised immersion, and we sketch some possible approaches to solve them. Finally, we present an Augmented Virtuality multisensory user interface for remote immersion, with future outlooks on telepresence.

Speaker's Brief Bio

Dr. Patrick Bourdot is Research Director at CNRS and head of VENISE team (http://www.limsi.fr/venise/), the Virtual & Augmented Reality (V&AR) research group he has created in 2001 at CNRS/LIMSI lab. Architect graduated in 1986, he received his PhD in Computer Sciences at the University of Aix-Marseille in 1992, joined the CNRS/LIMSI lab in 1993. His main research focuses are multi-sensorimotor, multimodal and collaborative V&AR interactions, and the related issues for users’ perception and cognition. He coordinated the scientific partnership of his Lab or led a number of research projects which have been or are currently funded by French government (RNTL, ANR), or by national or regional research institutes (CNRS, DIGITEO). He has been the founding secretary of AFRV, the French association of V&AR, and co-chaired its 5th conference (http://afrv2010.limsi.fr/). At the international level, one of his actions has been to manage the CNRS Labs involved in INTUITION, the NoE of the 6th IST framework focused on V&AR, where he was member of the Core Group. He is founding member of EuroVR (www.eurovr-association.org), and has been re-elected last year to its Executive Board. He organised the first Special Interest Groups meeting of EuroVR (http://eurovr-eve-2010.limsi.fr/), during the inauguration of the EVE system, an innovative CAVE-like setup, whose he defined the specification and implemented with the VENISE team. He is presently organizing JVRC 2013, the 5th Joint Virtual Reality Conference of EGVE and EuroVR (http://jvrc2013.sciencesconf.org/), which will take this December in Paris area. Dr. Patrick Bourdot has a large number of international publications in most important V&AR conferences such as IEEE VR, ACM VRST, IEEE 3DUI or EGVE, and many others international or national papers in the fields of 3D modelling, 3D reconstruction, and HCI. He has been or is reviewer or expert for several national and international journals, conferences or research agencies.

 
Prof Mel SLATER
ICREA-University of Barcelona, Spain
University College London, UK

Immersive Virtual Reality: Changing the Self Not Just the Place

Abstract

Virtual reality has typically been used to induce an illusory transformation of location. Instead of being in, for example, a lab, the participant has the illusion of being somewhere else, engaging in different activities. In recent years a great deal has been learned in cognitive neuroscience about how the brain represents the body. It has been found, counter to common sense, that although we tend to believe that our bodies are relatively stable it is surprisingly easy to generate the illusion that the body has radically changed.

For example, the rubber hand illusion shows that a rubber arm can be incorporated into what feels as if it is part of the body, the shrinking waist illusion can give the strong sensation of the waist radically reducing (or expanding) in size, and Pinocchio illusion that the nose has grown very long. It has been shown that an illusory transformation of the whole body is possible including the substitution of the real body by a virtual body. In this talk I will describe some of these illusions, but concentrate more on their behavioural and attitudinal correlates. It turns out that if you have a different body then at least temporarily this affects your attitudes and behaviours, opening up new experiences and feelings. In other words there is a new path for virtual reality - to change the self and not just the place.

Speaker's Brief Bio

Mel Slater is an ICREA Research Professor at the University of Barcelona. He became Professor of Virtual Environments at University College London in 1997. He was a UK EPSRC Senior Research Fellow from 1999 to 2004, and has received substantial funding for virtual reality installations in both London and Barcelona. Twenty nine of his PhD students have obtained their PhDs since 1989. In 2005 he was awarded the Virtual Reality Career Award by IEEE Virtual Reality ‘In Recognition of Seminal Achievements in Engineering Virtual Reality.’ He leads the eventLab (www.event-lab.org) at UB. He is Coordinator of the EU 7th Framework Integrated Project VERE (www.vereproject.org), and scientific leader of the Integrated Project BEAMING (www.beaming-eu.org). He holds a European Research Council grant TRAVERSE (www.traverserc.org) on the specific topic virtual embodiment, and the general topic of a new area of application of virtual reality based on this theme.